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A SHORT HISTORY OF...

Each year since 1992 EUROCLIO organises, in cooperation with one of its Member As­sociations, a big international meeting as professional training and development

course on a topic that is Europe wide rel­evant for school History education. Until now 18 EUROCLIO Annual Professional Training and Development Conferences have taken place annually in the past two decades with a growing success: starting with 60 people from 4 countries in Scotland in 1993, the participation reached up to 160 participants from 45 countries in 2005 in Latvia and 2006 in Malta, 190 people from 40 countries in the Netherlands in 2010 and in 2012 in Turkey 200 people from more than 50 countries are expected.

I. An appealing diversity

… Of locations

Each year the EUROCLIO Annual Meeting is held in a different country of Europe,

thus fostering the transnational mobility of History educators. The past EUROCLIO Annual Professional Training and Develop­ment Conferences have been organised in a variety of locations ranging from Baltic and Scandinavian countries to countries from the Mediterranean and from the Bal­kans. Participants to these events have had the opportunity to travel to discover contrasted national realities from small (Wales,2004) as well as big (Italy, 2003) na­tions,

from western (England, 2008) as well as post-soviet (Czech Republic 2002) coun­tries but also divided (Cyprus 2009), border areas (Netherlands 2010) and now Turkey, the bridge between West and East.

choice of a relevant theme. The promotion of European values and the connection

to the most contemporary challenges in education are an important concern. The

EUROCLIO Conferences invite participants to reflect on untouched or sensitive issues

such as the history of everyday life (Estonia 2001) or the history of minorities (Prague 2002); to evaluate the role of history educa­tion in the promotion of active citizenship (Malta 2006) or Human Rights (Slovenia 2007); to address civic society challenges such as national identity (Scotland 1999) , intercultural dialogue (Cyprus 2009), Teach­ing common European History, Themes, Perspectives and Levels (Netherlands 2010) and now Looking at History through a Va­riety of Lenses in Turkey in 2012.

… Of themes

The themes for the EUROCLIO Annual Meetings are carefully chosen in order to meet the areas of interest and needs of history educators from different countries and in order to give them food for thought and opportunities for innovative thinking. Cross-border issues related to both the content and the methodology of his­tory education are always addressed in the choice of a relevant theme. The promotion of Euro­pean values and the connection to the most contemporary challenges in educa­tion are an important concern. The EURO­CLIO Conferences invite participants to reflect on innovative and sometimes sensi­tive issues such as the history of everyday life (Estonia 2001) or the history of minorities (Prague 2002); to evaluate the role of history education in the promotion of active citizenship (Malta 2006) or Human Rights (Slovenia 2007); or intercultural dialogue (Cyprus 2009) and Looking for common European history in the Netherlands (2010).

… Of content

The format of the EUROCLIO Annual Meet­ings is a combination of theory and practice through academic lectures and interactive workshops on innova­tive classroom practices. The organisers always put a great care in setting up an intensive and rich in content programme to which contribute a wide range of local and international experts in History Edu­cation. Representatives of national and transnational educational authorities are often contributing. The programme also offers on-site learning through study visits to schools and historical places, and gives room to discussions and informal exchanges between participants.

A key contribution to the lifelong learning of history educators

The EUROCLIO Annual Meetings are capacity building events pro­viding transnational transfer of knowl­edge and experience. Lectures, workshops, discussion groups and study visits stim­ulate participating history educators to implement innovative teaching practices in their classroom and to work towards a frame­work for a common European approach for school history.

Participants improve their knowledge of foreign cultures and get acquainted with new educational contents, services, and methods. Participants to the EUROCLIO Annual Meeting have testified afterwards that they felt inspired and stimulated to share with other colleagues and with their students what they learnt. People feel em­powered to set up activities and contribute to follow-up events or to the next Annual Meeting.

II. A unique opportunity for cross-border networking

The EUROCLIO Annual Meetings bring to­gether representatives from many coun­tries in Europe and beyond. The educators who took part in the EUROCLIO Annual Professional Training and Development Conferences in the past expressed their feeling of great satisfaction to be given such a good opportunity to exchange ideas and views with colleagues dealing with history education all around Europe and beyond and to learn from each other in a formal and informal manner. Participants to the EUROCLIO Annual Meetings often mentioned to have made new valuable contacts with colleagues with whom they even sometimes cooperated for follow-up actions such as invitations and exchanges.

III. A yearly highlight in the life of a democratic organisation

The organisation of the EUROCLIO Annual Meeting is a truly collaborative initia­tive. The EUROCLIO Board, the EUROCLIO Secretariat and the local History Educators Association hosting the event are working in close cooperation in careful planning of the programme. Intense communication, sharing of responsibilities and common decision making process ensure a smooth process and strengthen the organizational skills of EUROCLIO.

Each Annual Professional Training and Development Conference is also the op­portunity for the members, the highest governing body of EUROCLIO, to con­vene during the General Assembly to evaluate the results of the past year, discuss the association’s policy for the future, and deal in a democratic way with procedures such as the election of the Board members, the admission of the new members, and possibly some other aspects related to the governance of the organisation. During the General Assembly all members can express their opinion and make their voice heard on any issue related to the life of the as­sociation. Information about the agenda of the General Assembly is sent in advance and all possible efforts are made to help representatives of the member associa­tions to participate